Glen Brunswick

Glen Brunswick is a comic book writer from America, most well-known for his works Jersey Gods, Non-Humans and most recently Reality Check (a review of which can be found here: http://whatculture.com/comics/reality-check-1-review.php)

I had chance to ask Glen a few questions about the comic and here are the answers!

The first issue of Reality Check has done really well. Are you pleased with the success of it?

It’s always exciting to have readers react to your material, positive or negative–although positive is usually better.

Were you worried about writing a comic about a comic book writer? Did you worry that people would think you were basically writing about yourself?

Well, there is some of me in there.  The negative attributes are all me.  I wouldn’t say that I worried a lot about it.  It was nice to write about an arena that I didn’t have to do a whole lot of research for.  The old write what you know adage.

How much of a collaboration is there between you and Viktor Bogdonavic? Did you have an idea of how you wanted the characters and artwork to look before you started writing or did Viktor help create the visual world as well?

I gave Viktor the finished script and pretty much just let him come up with his vision.  He came up with the design for WIllard in one take.  We went through a few different concepts for Dark Hour, but it didn’t take him long to develop.  Our collaboration is very much a creative partnership.  You have to remember that the first person you pitch your ideas to in the process is your collaborator.  It’s tough to get someone on board without a fully fleshed out idea.  These things take a lot of time to produce–so you better sign up for an idea that you really care about.  Viktor is not only an amazing artist, he has a terrific story sense as well.  He also adds details that I’ve forgotten that should have been there in the first place.  Now that’s the kind of collaborator you need to be a good writer.

Is it hard only doing a 4 issue mini-series or had you always planned to fit the story into 4 issues?

This was always going to be a contained four issue story.  I like that form of story telling because it allows for your characters to really grow and learn.  You can also leave them in a very different place than where they began–there is no status quo.  It also allows for the possibility that characters might be vulnerable–no guarantees that everyone gets out alive.  I’m speaking in generalities now not specifically about my story.  I do have an idea for a sequel though if it seems like readers demand to see more.

Is there any chance of a Dark Hour spin off?

I don’t think so.

Was the dig at Marvel and DC based on your own experiences with them?

Actually it was more of a made up story beat.  Willard sees the fact that Marvel and DC are asking about his availability and not offering work as a bad thing.  But when he pitches his comic to the indy publisher in the book it’s the fact that they heard that Marvel and DC were pursuing him that causes them to be more interested in his story.  It’s more of a comment on how perception works to sell things in the entertainment business.

How is working for Image, knowing that they thrive on the creator owned work? Does it allow you to take your stories in a direction that other publishers wouldn’t really appreciate?

It’s great.  No editorial interference.  If anything they just help you find the vision you wanted to develop for your story.  I love working for Image

Any chance of a hint at how the rest of the Reality Check story is going to develop?

What’s the fun of that?  Okay, things get worse before they get better….then worse again and…  Well, you get the idea.  Standard story stuff–with major exciting twists and turns within the structure of a tale that will elevate your mind and soul all while entertaining you with the pure joy of emotion in an action framework…exhale.

What comics are you currently reading? Any recommendations?

I really like LAZARUS by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.  Very intrigued to see where they go with it.

Thanks very much!

My pleasure.  Thanks for taking time out to interview me.

 

Get more like this direct to your Facebook feed.

Write about Comics and GET PAID. To find out more about the perks of being a Comics contributor at WhatCulture.com, click here.

In this post:

This article was first posted on September 18, 2013