10 Biggest Mistakes Zack Snyder Has Made In His Movies (So Far)

"Can we get some more slo-mo up in here?" - Zack Snyder, all the time, every day

Robert Tiemstra

Contributor

Snyder Gif

Warner Bros. Pictures/Universal Pictures

In continuing to combat Marvel in the franchise building superhero movie market, DC have declared their new champion: Zack Snyder. The man who helmed Watchmen, 300, and most infamously Man of Steel will be taking the DC cinematic universe to the next level with Batman vs. Superman movie in 2016, and Justice League immediately after that.

So now is as good a time as any to look back at his body of work to see whether he is really up to the task. As a director, Zack Snyder has created some of the most visually interesting action films of the last decade, but they come in a wide range of quality. From good films, to bad films, to mediocre ones, almost every single film Snyder has directed is flawed in one way or another.

In this list we have compiled the top 10 times Zack Snyder has messed up – whether it be poor adaptation choices, tonal missteps, or just bad scenes in general. If there are any of Zack Snyder’s big mistakes you can think of that didn’t make this list (or if you disagree with any of our choices), be sure to say so in the comments section. Spoilers below.

 

Honorable Mention: General Zod’s Death – Man Of Steel

Warner Bros.

Warner Bros.

The murder of General Zod by Superman in Zack Snyder’s own Man of Steel is among the most controversial comic book movie moments of the last decade, but it is not a moment that ruins the tone of the movie. In fact, it would not have made this list at all for the decision alone, but what bumps it up to honorable mention status is the scene’s execution (no pun intended).

When defending his choice to end Zod’s life – something considered quite out of character for any adaptation of Superman – Zack Snyder chose to point out he was trying to establish why Superman would never want to kill again, because he is given no alternative in this instance. Either the innocent people die, or Zod does. However, Snyder’s own staging of that scene makes reading it that way a difficult task the first time around – mainly because it looks like the family in that scene could escape without too much difficulty anyways.