5 Reasons Why American Hustle Could Be The Best Film Of 2013

We’re moving closer and closer toward the finish line for 2013, and yet there are still some big films to…

Haydn Spurrell

Contributor

American Hustle Maxi

We’re moving closer and closer toward the finish line for 2013, and yet there are still some big films to come. Of them is the Hunger Games’ sequel, the Martin Scorcese-directed, Leonardo DiCaprio-starring The Wolf of Wall Street, as well as the highly anticipated The Hobbit and Anchorman sequels. There’s something to get excited about for all kinds of film fans, yet the one that seems the most intriguing, and to have the most potential, is ‘American Hustle’.

It’s set to make its mark in the middle to late part of December, and will be fresh in everyone’s minds as we head into the award season. But this isn’t just a premature ‘for your consideration’ advert. This is in anticipation of a movie that is slowly, but surely, building hype. Here are five reasons to get excited for this late December release.

 

5. Danny Elfman

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A film’s score can be subtle, or it can be distinct. It can stand out, it can complement the film or it can resurrect it. A powerful composition can elevate a film. As composer Bernard Herrmann said, “it can invest the scene with terror, grandeur, gaiety or misery. It can propel narrative swiftly forward, or slow it down. It often lifts mere dialogue into the realm of poetry.”

Some scores fly well and truly under the radar, while others ignite us so emphatically. Danny Elfman has an extensive discography. From his early work creating the iconic 1989 Batman theme, to his more recent work on a number of films with Tim Burton, Elfman has always been a regular name within the film industry. While not the most memorable or most successful, his composition has a beauty and depth to it that entices emotion.

His recent work on Silver Linings Playbook was subtle, yet it had a unique impact on the story, and it’s hard to imagine that film without the somewhat repetitive, but in no way dragging, theme throughout. He adjusted the main tune just enough to convey each different scene’s emotional drive. And promisingly enough, the winning formula of director and composer has been retained, as Elfman joins David O. Russell for the second time in as many years.