Glass Review: 5 Ups & 5 Downs

The best and worst of M. Night Shyamalan.

Glass James McAvoy
Universal

After almost two decades in the making, the climactic entry into M. Night Shyamalan's most unexpected superhero trilogy is finally among us.

And though the Oscar-nominated filmmaker appeared to be regaining his critical favour following back-to-back hits in The Visit and Split, Glass is sadly yet another ding for the divisive director.

To be completely fair to the movie, it's certainly not among the worst efforts of his career, but probably sharing the closest DNA with The Village: an ambitious and mysterious film which takes some bold chances that don't really pay off.

Shyamalan deserves mild credit for not taking the most predictable path possible, but the end result is ultimately an unsatisfying hodgepodge of half-developed ideas elevated by the (mostly) strong performances of the cast.

With its inevitable box office success, Glass shouldn't do much damage to Shyamalan's career, though if you were hoping it would cement the director's creative renaissance, prepare to be left wildly underwhelmed.

If you go in with appropriate expectations, however, there are certainly things to enjoy here. But first, the downs...

Contributor
Contributor

Stay at home dad who spends as much time teaching his kids the merits of Martin Scorsese as possible (against the missus' wishes). General video game, TV and film nut. Occasional sports fan. Full time loon.