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Columbia Pictures

Unfortunately dear readers, we live in an age where movie directors have become ten-a-penny – example; My CV includes the term ‘director’ because I frequently record the dastardly activities exacted on my poor neighbourhood by a group of troublesome youths (of which I am one) on my iPhone. But, like every dark tunnel, there is a light at the end – and it comes in the form of a slightly overexcited Tennessean (a man from Tennessee).

Quentin Jerome Tarantino has been making films since before I can remember (I was born in 1993) and during his illustrious career has popularised some of the most imaginative camera shots in the industry (the trunk shot being literally the only one I can remember right now) – but what of the gunshots he has employed throughout the years? I know, it’s a considerably trivial subject, but surely there are a few people somewhere in the world that’s interested in such a topic?

Let’s find out …

Ever since Reservoir Dogs was released in 1992, the general populace has slowly come to notice two prominent facts about Quentin Tarantino films – 1) Many of them contain a character that looks suspiciously like the man himself, and 2) They all involve a rather graphic death or two (or 563 to be precise). These deaths have somehow made us grow quite fond of Quentin, in the same way we grew fond of the kid that used to use a magnifying glass to burn ants in pre-school – because at the end of the day it isn’t us who’ll eventually be locked up in a mental asylum, and hey, it is kinda interesting to see what happens.

With that in mind, please feel free to wallow guilt-free in the blood-and-guts-fest that is TarantinoLand, and join me as I chronicle some of the most elaborate ways he has found to shoot somebody onscreen. Just so you are aware, number 3 will contain some spoilers, as will (to a lesser extent) numbers 5,4,2 and 1.

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This article was first posted on December 31, 2013