10 Infectiously Huge Limp Bizkit Songs You All Know The Words To

Don't admit to your friends you're a Limp Bizkit fan, I won't tell them either. This will be our secret: this list is for you.

Alejandro Castro

Contributor

Fred Durst

Fred Durst

When Limp Bizkit emerged out of Jacksonville, Florida back in the late 90′s, many felt they rode in on the successful coattails of Korn. Truth be told, Limp Bizkit was and is a completely different band: they always have been. While Korn was often labelled as a hybrid between hip-hop, and metal, Limp Bizkit was perhaps, arguably, a more palatable version of the these two genres.

Unarguably, they rode a less blurred line between the two styles of music while Korn opted down the road of true innovation, adding elements of funk, electronica and other hybrid elements. Limp Bizkit, once considered to be on the same plain of respectability as Korn, settled into their place in the music world, falling into the ranks of the many other ‘nu-metal’ bands littering the airwaves throughout the 90′s and 2000′s.

Now, time for a story:

In late 2001, Bizkit’s guitar player, Wes Borland, left the band. Limp Bizkit held public auditions to replace Borland, of which this writer actually participated in.

I was a huge Limp Bizkit fan and I saw this as my golden ticket to the – wait for it – ticket to the Chocolate Starfish Factory. Myself and thousands of other hopefuls packed the streets outside the Guitar Center in Hollywood, off the world famous Sunset Strip, waiting our turns to go and make the case for earning a spot in one of the hottest acts of the time. I can tell you, first hand, it was a circus of fools, dreamers and the delusional, myself included. Limp Bizkit ended up recruiting Snot guitar player Mike Smith: the rest of us couldn’t help but feel like we were all played into being part of a massive marketing ploy.

After the huge successes of Three Dolla’ Bill Y’all$, Significant Other and Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water, the Borland-less Bizkit’s release of Results May Vary saw a version of Limp Bizkit that seemed to lack the fury, angst and heart of the original three albums. The Undeniable Truth Part I was an abysmal E.P. that despite the return of Borland, sounded like a poor man’s Rage Against The Machine. All the things that made Limp Bizkit who they were were gone. No sense of humour, no catchy hooks, no melody – and no sales. Limp Bizkit was dead in the water.

What was once a band of cultural high reverence became the butt of jokes. The band evaporated into obscurity: Fred Durst went on to direct a film and get bloated and he became the topic of meme’s. The words “Remember when Limp Bizkit was cool” were soon whisked away into the winds of change.

Nine years after the release of Chocolate Starfish, Limp Bizkit – somewhat quietly- released Gold Cobra. The album contained all original members, all new music, and quite frankly it rocked. It felt like the Bizkit of old. It was easily their best release since their heyday, and while critics and the public generally praised it, album sales stalled and Limp Bizkit was released by Interscope records – their home since 1997.
Limp Bizkit has since signed with Cash Money records and has a new album scheduled for early 2014. Who knows where this new path will lead them but there is little doubt as to their musical legacy, love them or hate them.

We all know these songs, we all know the words. Whether or not we choose to acknowledge it, Limp Bizkit have left their mark. Go to the clubs or the local sporting events and when Limp Bizkit are playing, people are still humming and bobbing along.

It’s okay to deny it. Don’t admit to your friends you’re a Limp Bizkit fan , I won’t tell them. This will be our secret: this list is for you.