Doctor Who Series 10: 7 Big Questions After 'Knock Knock'

Who's there? 

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As mysteries go the cliché ridden haunted house story is full of them, and Mike Bartlett’s debut Doctor Who episode Knock Knock is no exception. This deceptively simple tale, filled with many unanswered questions, hints at Bill’s desire to have a life outside the TARDIS as well as the Doctor’s reluctance to leave her alone.

The Doctor ought to be guarding that mysterious vault of his, as Nardole would no doubt be telling him, but instead he seems determined to keep a close watch on Bill. Good job too if this latest episode is anything to go by. With or without the Doctor, Bill seems destined not to have an ordinary student life.

We are a long way from the rift in Cardiff and as far as we know, in a welcome break from recent companions, Bill’s backstory is unexceptional. So why are alien forces at work in Bristol, seemingly independent of the Doctor and the TARDIS?

It’s unlikely that we’ll get an answer to such a question, for if such coincidences didn’t happen we’d be left without a story worth telling, but from the allusions to past Doctor Who adventures to the contents of the vault there are plenty of things we can reasonably conclude.

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Paul Driscoll is a freelance writer and author across a range of subjects from Cult TV to religion and social policy. He is a passionate Doctor Who fan and January 2017 will see the publication of his first extended study of the series (based on Toby Whithouse's series six episode, The God Complex) in the critically acclaimed Black Archive range by Obverse Books. He is a regular writer for the fan site Doctor Who Worldwide and has contributed several essays to Watching Books' You and Who range. Recently he has branched out into fiction writing, with two short stories in the charity Doctor Who anthology Seasons of War (Chinbeard Books). Paul's work will also feature in the forthcoming Iris Wildthyme collection (A Clockwork Iris, Obverse Books) and Chinbeard Books' collection of drabbles, A Time Lord for Change.

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