Game Of Thrones Ending: 12 Disturbing Implications You Probably Missed

Is anyone going to tell Grey Worm about those butterflies?

Game Of Thrones Finale
HBO

It's all over. The Iron Throne hasn't so much as been won as it's been melted into a pool of metallic goop by an angry dragon and the most unexpected of all players in the Great Game has emerged as the new king of the Six Kingdoms.

There were some great happy ending moments when the credits on Game Of Thrones rolled: Sansa being Queen of the North as the single most powerful example, with Jon's reunion with Ghost and Tormund a strong second and Brienne being given the lofty position she always deserved. But there were also some little hints of doom bundled in there as well.

Perhaps because this world has bred a culture of expecting the worst, it's impossible not to look at how the Game Of Thrones ended and not see where the potential darkness lies...

12. The Unsullied Are Literally All Doomed

Grey Worm Missandei
HBO

The Ending

Somehow, everyone manages to convince Grey Worm that freeing Dany's killer AND the man who betrayed her (which indirectly led to her death also) and he decides to deliver what he can on his promise to Missandei of a life of peace together. That manifests as him choosing to take the Unsullied to Naath, Missandei's homeland - with the implication that the historically dangerous place (because they make good slaves) would have the protection it was always robbed. Romance, thy name is Grey Worm.

But Wait...

The only problem there is that the island of Naath DOES have protection thanks to a set of the natives. The island is home to a type of large black and white butterfly that carry an infectious disease, imaginatively known as Butterly Fever. Sounds charming doesn't it? Wrong.

The infection first makes you feverous, then you start to spasm painfully to the point of dancing uncontrollably and then, just when you think it sounds quite entertaining, you sweat blood and your flesh just sort of comes off your bones. So yeah, a romantic gesture, but who's going to love a feverish, dancing skeleton?

Executive Editor
Executive Editor

Executive Editor, chief Gunter and the most read writer on WhatCulture. Like ever.