bbb

As we saunter on through the winter TV months, this past week’s episode of The Big Bang Theory has slowed the show’s Season 6 momentum. In a rather unusual turn of events, the show gets bogged down by plodding pacing and overall uninteresting storylines, save for one huge reveal.

This week’s episode find Raj and Howard, in a nice change of pace, spending most of the episode together for a change, as they embark on a quest to have themselves forever immortalized by way of the action figure. After a failed attempt at a mail-order reproduction of themselves, the guys go on to purchase a 3 dimensional printer capable of creating an action figure to their own specifications (how can I not be the only one thinking about Weird Science at this point?).

In the end, Howard in scolded by his wife as the age-old adage of married money becomes an issue, as Howard failed to ask his wife if he could spend the cash. Overall, a lazy premise from which to try and garner laughs, and a wasted opportunity overall at putting Raj and Howard back together, where they are usually golden.

The Cooper/Kripke Inversion

The larger story this week took place at the university, between Sheldon and his professional nemesis, Barry Kripke. The university asks the guys to work together on a grant proposal, and after trading ideas, Kripke thinks Sheldon is having too much coitus in order to really apply himself to his work. Sheldon indulges Kripke in his misplaced fantasy, which actually leads to a much larger revelation: Sheldon tells Penny and Leonard that he has been working on his issues of avoiding personal contact, so much so that he has not ruled out getting physical with Amy Farrah Fowler. This is a huge step in the Sheldon Cooper character, and I’m glad an otherwise dull episode had a small silver lining in the form of the huge revelation.

Agree or disagree fans? Let’s discuss! On Twitter: @davyshrader

Get more like this direct to your Facebook feed.

Write about TV and GET PAID. To find out more about the perks of being a TV contributor at WhatCulture.com, click here.

In this post:

This article was first posted on February 3, 2013