10 WWE Attitude Era Problems That Fans Don't Want To Admit

Did the 'Attitude Era' do more harm than people care to accept?

Before the pitchforks come out by the thousand, this article is not an attack on the success of the 'Attitude Era', because that would be silly. The sheer creativity and excitement of the period in undeniable, there was just so much going on and so many fresh ideas and characters for fans to explore that it'd be futile to say the era was anything other than successful. By the same token, not everything that happened during that particular generation can be rightly considered wonderful. Perhaps these entries are less of a damning verdict on the period and more a hailing of just how much content people were offered, everything felt fresh and vibrant, even when it wasn't actually the best thing for wrestling in retrospect. In the interest of fairness, it's only right to judge the 'Attitude Era' differently now than it was perceived at the time. Quite clearly, hindsight is a luxury, but it can't be denied that the era - running from the first use of the 'scratch' logo at the 1997 Survivor Series right up until the company became WWE in May, 2002 - wasn't 100% rosy. Since WWE grabbed their kid-friendly hats and went 'PG' in 2008, there's been a heightened sense that the 'Attitude Era' was the good old days. As this article explores, is that really the case across the board?
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Lifelong wrestling, video game, music and sports obsessive who has been writing about his passions since childhood. Also a pro wrestling commentator and former manager with a love of sparkly jackets.