Ranking Every NXT Call-Up From Worst To Best

You don't have to be popular to be successful.

WWE

Two things immediately spring to mind when poring over NXT's graduates from the past five years.

Firstly, is the sheer number of matriculants who've eventually donned the cap and gown and posed for their Full Sail diploma. Since Florida Championship Wrestling formally rebranded in June 2012, over 60 hopefuls have passed NXT's grappling undergrad programme.

A great number of those arrived with far more esteemed credentials; it's a piece of company-penned sophism that the Performance Centre produces world class talent. It mostly detains it.

Secondly, and more alarmingly, is the striking lack of success by the vast majority of its alumni. Obviously not all of over a half century of talent can make it big - but you'd expect the rate to be higher than a handful.

It almost feels as though the more time goes on, the less well the newbies fare. It's telling.

66. Eva Marie

WWE.com

Former model and pro-soccer player Eva Marie was such a colossal sack of sh*te on the main roster that she was sent to Full Sail for seasoning. Unfortunately, there's not much point adding spice to rotten meat, and she remarkably managed to return even worse than before.

Marie, who had all the wrestling prowess of a grandfather clock, isn't stupid, and began pursuing other interests when the 'Women's Evolution' raised the standard beyond her capabilities. She left the company in 2017.

Editorial Team
Editorial Team

Benjamin was born in 1987, and is still not dead. He variously enjoys classical music, old-school adventure games (they're not dead), and walks on the beach (albeit short - asthma, you know). He's currently trying to compile a comprehensive history of video game music, yet denies accusations that he purposefully targets niche audiences. He's often wrong about these things.

Discussion