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20 Things You Didn’t Know About Live And Let Die (1973)

"Say live and let die" and explore the secrets behind Roger Moore's gem of a first James Bond film.

MGM/UA

Live And Let Die (1973) was a fantastic debut for Sir Roger Moore as James Bond.

Often hailed as one of the most classic and memorable Double-0 Seven movies, Moore’s first Bond film continues to capture hearts and imaginations alike with its distinctive plot and truly mesmerising visuals.

When James Bond is sent to investigate the deaths of three British agents, he is launched into the world of voodoo and drug trafficking, coming up against Dr. Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), the Prime Minister of Caribbean island nation, San Monique, who is in league with US-based crime kingpin, Mr Big and uses the unique soothsaying powers of Solitaire (Jane Seymour) through her Tarot cards to keep one step ahead of his enemies.

Tracking the plot across New York City, San Monique, and New Orleans, Double-0 Seven starts to uncover the truth and grows close to smashing the drug plot with the aid of his CIA ally, Felix Leiter (Moore's personal friend, David Hedison).

There is plenty about the creation of this truly flamboyant and beloved Bond adventure that can slip through the net, but this list is guaranteed to give you “something in heads”.

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Contributor

I started writing for WhatCulture in July 2020. I have always enjoyed reading and writing. I have contributed to several short story competitions and I have occasionally been fortunate enough to have my work published. During the COVID-19 lockdown, I also started reviewing films on my Facebook page. Numerous friends and contacts suggested that I should start my own website for reviewing films, but I wanted something a bit more diverse - and so here I am! My interests focus on film and television mainly, but I also occasionally produce articles that venture into other areas as well. In particular, I am a fan of the under appreciated sequel (of which there are many), but I also like the classics and the mainstream too.