10 Things Comic Fans Miss About Old DC Animation

Let's face it, the old stuff was much better.

Warner Bros.

For over 20 years now, Warner Bros. Animation has been producing some of the finest programmes and films in the business, with their most successful outings of course revolving around the titular heroes of the DC Universe.

Recently however? Their releases have been less than exemplary. The decline can be traced back to the demise of DC's old universe, with the New 52 sadly alienating a great deal of fans with its rupturing of continuity and unchecked editorial interference. Sadly, its roots have also worked their way into DC's once immaculate animated efforts, with films like Justice League: War and Son of Batman embedding themselves very comfortably in the annals of animated mediocrity.

Uniform art styles and rigid story telling never used to be the norms of Warner Bros.' animated adaptations, but they certainly are now. It's not just the films that have suffered either though - high quality TV programming has all been gradually eroded as executive focus turns its gaze towards toy sales - Young Justice and Green Lantern: The Animated Series being the most high profile of victims to this profit-making approach. In their wake came Beware The Batman and Teen Titans: Go!, and though the latter has won over fans in recent years, everyone still misses the old stuff.

For over a decade fans were treated to an animated universe unafraid to ask big questions, approach big themes, and tap into source material in a way like no other. For many, it proved to be their introduction to the world of capes and cowls - and what a fine one it was. Some may say that this is just unfettered nostalgia run awry, but it's hard to deny that DC Animation was at its best when the likes of Paul Dini, Bruce Timm and the late Dwayne McDuffie were at the helm.

Comics Editor
Comics Editor

WhatCulture's very own Comics Editor. Cats, comic books and spaghetti westerns are my thing. Rants about stuff @EwanRuinsThings

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