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Boredom is a difficult subject to tangle with in film, seeing as the very nature of visiting the cinema or renting/buying a feature is to ease the tedium caused by work, domesticity, and the like. As a social facet, boredom is the not the most potent or enthralling option for film makers when compared to say, violence, crime, romance, subcultures, or infidelity. The challenge posed by this chink in the human psyche is one that only a very gifted artist can undertake when, ironically, the objective is to make the monotony of living interesting for the viewer.

The critical factor of boredom is how an individual or group reacts to it, for acknowledgement and response is inevitable, which can vary in degrees of severity. The counteraction is the artist’s most valuable tool, opening a gateway of ideas and possibilities to experiment with. Once this part of the process is determined, detailed, laborious work can begin on the construction of mise-en-scene, character development, and the direction of the narrative.

Throughout the cinematic timeline, the masses have always been attracted to films that perform on a grand scale, where realism is replaced by the fantastical, so when a film-maker makes the bold decision to tackle everday, commonplace affairs, he/she knows that they are in for an uphill struggle. Even in the independent circle, critical acclaim is not guaranteed and is often more difficult to garner no matter how intelligent or authentic the film attempts to be, and therefore a consistent blend of hard work and ingenuity is paramount.

With any luck, the fruits of one’s labours will culminate into something splendid and engaging, and even if the end product is not a widespread commercial success, artistic merit will go a long way for those who put their heart and soul into the work. And so, here are three pictures that prove that even boredom can spark intrigue.

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This article was first posted on April 23, 2013