Draco

Inspirationally Harry Potter is all over the place, with creator J.K. Rowling picking from pretty much every fantasy story ever. It helped create a world that for over a decade readers and viewers fell in love with. And rightfully so; for all the book’s simplistic writing and the film’s length it was a joy to be in that world of wizards and witches.

Rowling is always praised for creating a tight story light on plot holes and heavy planning. Now this is where I begin to take objection. Clearly elements of the story was planned ahead, but many of the world’s wider rules are clearly made up on the fly, leading to some pretty irritating discrepancies. This problem is only made worse by the films; with four directors over ten years, numerous problems arose that little effort was made to fix.

Here are ten of the biggest continuity errors in the Harry Potter series. All are present in the film series, but a startling amount come from the source material. Ready to bust open some plot holes? Alohomora!

 

Honourable Mention – Time Travel Worries

Turner

One plot hole commonly brought up about Harry Potter is the presence of the time turner; if the wizards were capable of time travel why didn’t they just go back and stop Voldemort back when he was young Tom Riddle?

Well for starters, we don’t know how far back you can actually go; maybe the turner has a limited reach. But more importantly, if you’re asking that questions you’re missing the point of the final act of Prisoner Of Azkaban. When Harry and Hermione travel back in time by a few hours they don’t actually change anything – they were always there, hence how they got out of the situation in the first place. The saving of Buckbeak does admittedly confuse this, but given the multiple points towards the truth (Hermione makes the wolf whistle, Harry throws a stone at himself) it’s amazing anyone misunderstood it.

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This article was first posted on August 8, 2013