Metal Gear Solid V: 10 Things The Phantom Pain Needs

In typically bizarre fashion, Hideo Kojima unveiled the much-anticipated Metal Gear Solid V last night at the GDC, confirming the…

Shaun Munro

Contributor

Metal Gear Solid V

In typically bizarre fashion, Hideo Kojima unveiled the much-anticipated Metal Gear Solid V last night at the GDC, confirming the rather obvious fact that the new IP The Phantom Pain was, in fact, MGSV all along. However, there’s a twist in the tale; the previously-announced title Ground Zeroes is also MGSV – they form two parts of a campaign that will begin with Ground Zeroes prior to Big Boss ending up in a 9-year coma, after which the events of The Phantom Pain will presumably take place.

Sifting through the information handed out makes for a pretty confusing time as gamers; there’s a lot to be excited about and a lot to be wary about too. Still, given Kojima’s track record, we fancy his chances for delivering yet another glorious belter in one of gaming’s greatest franchises.

Here are 10 things Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain needs…

 

 

10. No David Hayter? No Sale

David Hayter

Aside from Kojima, the other mainstay of the MGS franchise to date has been David Hayter, the voice of Solid Snake and Big Boss whose unmistakably gruff vocal presence has marked him out as one of the best and most iconic voice actors in video game history. However, it was announced yesterday that Hayter would not be providing the voice work for Big Boss in MGSV, something that’s pretty hard to get your head around if you’re a hardcore fan of the series.

The presumption at this point is that Richard Doyle, who voiced Big Boss in MGS4, will be cast for MGSV, and though he gave a spirited performance in MGS4’s epilogue sequence, it seemed obvious that he was cast only so that David Hayter didn’t have to hold a conversation with himself at the end. Given that Solid Snake presumably will be nowhere to be seen throughout the events of The Phantom Pain, it seems ridiculous not to use Hayter’s hugely popular vocal register.

Unless there’s some sort of rational explanation for this, it makes me very nervous indeed.