Star Trek: The Video Game – 5 Reasons It Needs To Be Good

Star Trek has had a long gaming history, dating all the way back to 1971’s Star Trek text game. But…

Xavier Santana

Contributor

USS Enterprise under Attack

Star Trek has had a long gaming history, dating all the way back to 1971’s Star Trek text game. But ever since the release of Star Trek: Legacy in 2006, there’s been a dearth of officially licensed games (fan games and mods are still alive and well though). Aside from Star Trek: Online, there haven’t been any AAA titles released since the critical bomb that was Legacy. That ended when a new Trek game was unveiled during E3 2011 – a third person co-op shooter named “Star Trek,” set after the first JJ Abrams film and featuring Kirk and Spock as the main characters.

Originally slated to be released in 2012, it was pushed back to April 23, 2013, as part of the Star Trek Into Darkness marketing campaign.

Here’s 5 reasons this new Star Trek game needs to be good.

5. There’s Zero Press

Spock on ruined Vulcan colony

The new Star Trek game is being made with Bad Robot’s supervision to ensure everything lines up with the new vision of Trek that JJ Abrams and company have come up with. Unfortunately, this means we barely know anything about the game, despite being only three months away from release. What we do know is that the story involves the Gorn (aka the giant lizard man Kirk punched and shot with a homemade canon in the original series), there are different Gorn castes, a space station and a Vulcan colony are involved, and you can do some exploration of the Enterprise.

While this stuff does sound cool, that’s all we have aside from some pictures, the pre-order bonus info (guns and clothes, if you are interested), and a few videos. Even for diehard Trek gamers, that’s not a lot to base a purchase on when you’re spending $60 for a game. As a Trek fan, even I can’t get too excited about a game I barely know anything about – a few interviews here and there doesn’t give me the information I need to make an informed purchase. That said, if the game turns out to be good, a lot of people will be praising the decision to not give out info ahead of time and spoil the story. If not, Digital Extreme and Bad Robot will get a lot of hate mail about how they suckered people into buying a bad game.