WWE Trademark New Show Name, Talent Trademarks Hashtag

There's something familiar about this...

Wwe When World Collide
WWE/AAA

According to PWInsider, WWE have filed to trademark the term "When Worlds Collide" for the purposes of live wrestling shows.

No other information has been released at present, though it seems fairly certain the name will be used, if not for a full-blown pay-per-view, then at the very least a Network special of some description.

There are a few possibilities. WWE's PPV calendar for 2019 has a 'TBA' show tentatively penciled in for October, though that could just as easily take the 'Halloween Havoc' name the company registered last year (spoiler: it won't). The name, indicative of some form of brand warfare, could also replace traditional Raw vs. SmackDown show Survivor Series, a concept Vince McMahon has reportedly been looking to axe for years. At present, Survivor Series 2019 is already listed for this November at the Rosemont Horizon - but nothing would stand in the way of a change of appellation.

That said, 'When Worlds Collide' could just as easily be a special supershow in Somalia or the Crimea. We just don't know.

What we do know is that it isn't the first wrestling show with this title. Back in November 1994, WCW and AAA cross-promoted the fantastic 'When Worlds Collide!', selling out all 13,000 seats in the LA Memorial Sports Arena. The show entered wrestling folklore for the stunning two-out-of-three falls contest between Art Barr & Eddie Guerrero against Octagón & El Hijo del Santo. To date, it is one of the few WCW PPVs not available on the Network.

There was another interesting trademark filed this week. Days after the acronym appeared on Scott Dawson's tights on Monday Night Raw, The Revival have registered the hashtag #FTR. The plot thickens.

We need more writers about WWE News and WWE When Worlds Collide! Get started below...

Create Content and Get Paid


Editorial Team
Editorial Team

Benjamin was born in 1987, and is still not dead. He variously enjoys classical music, old-school adventure games (they're not dead), and walks on the beach (albeit short - asthma, you know). He's currently trying to compile a comprehensive history of video game music, yet denies accusations that he purposefully targets niche audiences. He's often wrong about these things.