8 Crimes That Were Solved By The Internet

The internet is more than cats and memes. Sometimes it's a crime-fighter!

Don't F*ck With Cats Netflix
Netflix

The invention of the world wide web has forever altered the way humanity works as a civilisation.

It led to massive global connectivity, extensive access to general knowledge/information, and countless commonalities which we have grown to take for granted. But, while some deem the internet as a vapid bout of social media and time-wasting, it has proven to be invaluable in the realm of crime-solving.

While the internet might not seem like the best place for detectives and crime-stoppers, it boasts a vast pool of people who can deduct information and assist the police force in breaking through cases.

There have been plenty of examples where the internet has led to cases being solved, as the brilliant amateur sleuths on sites like Reddit, Twitter and more have co-operated and given vital information to the forces that need it. This hasn't just put an end to some awful acts but also generated some pretty compelling stories.

The following eight cases are some prime examples of fascinating times where the technology of the modern age has helped us in ways we'd never have expected.

8. The Lottery Killer

Winning the lottery is something that can change a person's life entirely for the better. But, it can also put a target on your back.

After winning a humungous $17 million on a scratch card, Abraham Shakespeare thought he'd be living the high life, but he eventually turned up dead, buried in the backyard of a home purchased by his financial adviser Dorice "Dee Dee" Moore.

Although many officers were suspicious of Moore, there wasn't much evidence to prove it. But, that all changed once Websleuths threw their hat in the ring.

After the site began to post about the crime, Moore tried to clear her name by "anonymously" logging in to defend herself, eventually admitting to the murder. Sadly for Moore, she had no clue about IP logging, which led to members divulging her IP data to police, giving them all they needed.

Moore's story was shockingly inconsistent, as it changed all over the place, and her guilt was obvious. She's now serving a life sentence behind bars, showing that if you want to use the internet to bury your crime, make sure you know what you're doing first.

In this post: 
True Crime
 
Posted On: 
Contributor

Michael is my name, overanalysing comedy is my game! I’m a Bristol-boy who moved out to Surrey to get his BA and then moved on to get an MA from the Guildford School of Acting. I am your bog-standard freaky geeky lad.