10 Embarrassing Superhero Movies Hollywood Wants You To Forget

2012 was a mega year for superhero movies. Not only did Nolan bring his third and final Dark Knight movie...

Simon Gallagher

Executive Editor

Fantastic Four

2012 was a mega year for superhero movies. Not only did Nolan bring his third and final Dark Knight movie to the screen, to the collected hysteria of almost the entire world, but the Avengers made their first collective appearance and a new Spider-Man showed up with an edgier attitude and wicked skateboard skills that anyone over the age of 25 probably groaned at a little bit.

And the tide of good will to all comic book adaptations shows no signs of stopping, with a whole new phase for Marvel, but a hotly anticipated attempt to make a JLA movie from DC, plus new X-Men, Antman, Wolverine, Guardians Of The Galaxy and many, many more incoming. It’s good to be a comic book movie fan at the minute.

But it wasn’t always so, and dirtying the mostly very impressive relationship between comics and movies are those repugnant, terrible early efforts before anyone really got a hold of how to make comic book movies properly. They are the idiot, deranged siblings of the new breed of comic book movies, and frankly Hollywood would prefer they stayed in the shadows, because they give this brand new, lucrative sub-genre a bit of a bad reputation.

Behold, those ten superhero movies that Hollywood would prefer we all forgot were ever made…

1. The Fantastic Four (1994)

  • Starring: Alex Hyde-White, Jay Underwood, Michael Bailey Smith and Rebecca Staab.

Back in 1994, in order to maintain Constantin Film’s hold on the movie rights to the Fantastic Four characters, Roger Corman – director of the original Little Shop of Horrors and countless B-Movie crimes – was brought in to executive produce a tiny budgeted take on the property that was never really intended to be widely seen.

The majority of the $1.5 million budget went on quite impressive The Thing’s suit, and the sparse available money is pretty obvious in the rest of the effects.