10 Most Overused Lines In Movie History

There’s nothing quite like an awesome one-liner to be the cherry on top of an already great movie moment; whether...

Shaun Munro

Contributor

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There’s nothing quite like an awesome one-liner to be the cherry on top of an already great movie moment; whether it’s a humourous remark or a kick-ass quip, it can help to enhance what we’re watching and make it lodge in our minds forever more. This list is all about how lines that started out in cinema as original have become so over-used in their popularity or sheer familiarity that they’ve rendered themselves redundant, even annoying and cliched.

It’s easy to imagine that a lot of screenwriters throw these zingers into their scripts subconsciously, because they’re a part of the fabric of writing nowadays; that said, if the below montages prove anything, it’s that we’ve more than had our fill of the lot of them. These are 10 quotes that if I ever hear them in a film, I laugh sarcastically and instantly like the film that little bit less.

Here are the 10 most overused lines in movie history…

 

 

10. “We’re Not So Different, You And I”

If writers want to avoid viewers arriving at the conclusion that the protagonist and antagonist aren’t all that different by means of subtext, they can always just flat-out have one of them say it, eschewing any and all subtlety in order to make an overstated point.

“We’re not so different, you and I” and countless variations of it have appeared in numerous films throughout the ages – Raiders of the Lost Ark, Falling Down, Transformers, Red Dawn, X-Men: First Class to name but a few – such that it’s been spoofed in films like Austin Powers (see the video above) and Small Soldiers.

It’s overused in both its titular form and its variant form because the notion that the villain and the hero are at once the antithesis and thesis of one another is itself overused; the yin-yang that binds them together was dramatically involving for, oh, the first few decades it was used. By now it’s just trite and boring, something writers fall back on when they can’t think of a more interesting way to bind the opposing forces.