8 Notions That Help To Explain BioShock Infinite’s Ending

I’ll start by saying that this article contains massive spoilers. I will be talking entirely about the game’s ending in…

Patrick Dane

Contributor

Bioshock 4

I’ll start by saying that this article contains massive spoilers. I will be talking entirely about the game’s ending in detail, so if you haven’t beaten the game yet, go off and do that then come back. We good? We’re good.

Bioshock Infinite seems to still be on everyone’s lips and rightfully so. While there are still tons of great games to come out this year, it is not hard to imagine it walking away with tons of awards.

But while we are on the subject of ends, Bioshock Infinite’s left some people scratching their heads. Some are convinced it is the best ending in gaming history, others thinking that it is an empty twist, whereas others like it but don’t understand some of its finer points. I must admit, I wasn’t sure of the ending when I first saw it, but once I sat and thought about it, it is actually all very cleverly done.

So allow me to clean a few things up for you if you were lost or just come and explore the fantastic ending with me once again…

 

8. Booker/Comstock

BioShock-Infinite-Explained-Quantum-Theory

When this first happened, I was a little skeptical. It seemed like a somewhat forced twist: Booker DeWitt is actually Zachary Hale Comstock? That was until I sat back and thought about it and really it says something really quite interesting about fate.

When Elizabeth shows you the many lighthouses towards the end of game, she explains that each one represents another reality. Each with their own “constant and variables”. Every reality has a set of predetermined actions that it must abide by, while also having a set of actions that can change form reality to reality, but most importantly it all ends in the same place. For example, it doesn’t matter if you kill Slate or not, your game will end in the same place. Elizabeth sums it up by saying, “We swim in different oceans, but land on the same shore”

So each reality starts with a choice. Full of grief due to his time at the battle of Wounded Knee, Booker decides to absolve himself of his sins by getting baptism and accepting relgion. This is where the realities differ. In one Booker may decide to accept baptism, in which case he accepts relgion and becomes Comstock, or in another Booker may decide to reject Baptism, and he will go on to be the Booker we play through with. You all this knew this right? Well good, because it is going to inform everything else.