Prey: 5 Reasons Why The Story Ultimately Fails

It's good, not great.

Bethesda

Releasing to rather positive reviews, Prey is garnering comparisons to Half-Life and Bioshock. These are really big shoes to fill, and amazingly, the gameplay seems to validate such comparisons.

The same cannot be said about the plot however, which, although ambitious, ultimately fails to deliver on its promise.

Spoilers follow.

In the year 2032, siblings Alex and Morgan Yu are aboard space station Talos I, investigating an alien life-form named the Typhon, which has invaded Earth. As the Typhon don't use any language, their objective is to implement aliens with empathy, so that they can understand humans and hopefully leave our planet in peace.

The problem is that the Typhon are not willing to cooperate, and the player has to kill a lot of their kind in order to reach his goal, which is either save or kill everybody on the station.

The game tackles some interesting topics like enhancement or consciousness, but doesn't do it too convincingly. Granted, the ending explains some of these events, but it does not make up for rather disappointing script.

That is, if we want to put the game in the same category as the aforementioned first-person shooters that conveyed a deeper message.

If not, Prey is still a really good game, although not as deep as it intends to be...

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I write sitting with my dogs on the sofa, which often leads to whole paragraphs being deleted by a single touch of a paw or a nose.

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