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10 Movies You Didn't Know Were Made In Britain

superman train Filming is rooted in deception, and we all know a guy who will regale us with gems of production hoodwinking; like the fact that Norma Desmond€™s house in Sunset Boulevard (1950) was actually located on Wilshire Boulevard. My favourite€”and one whose subtlety is lost in our product placement-drenched age€”is the bit in Goldfinger (1964) when CIA agents, supposedly in Baltimore, mooch outside a Kentucky Fried Chicken. They filmed that scene in Miami, and English director Guy Hamilton (unaware Colonel Sanders€™ nasty produce was a franchise) thought it was an extraordinary coincidence. Britain, home to some of the world€™s finest studios (Pinewood, Shepperton) and technical crews€”otherwise solely occupied with Richard Curtis romantic comedies and Downton Abbey€”is a natural haven for a shrewd Hollywood refugee. But you may still be surprised at some of the following visits to Limey shores. To celebrate the news that J.J. Abrams' Star Wars: Episode 7 will be filmed in England, here's 10 movies that you may not suspect were also shot in Blighty. Oh, and I've also mentioned a giveaway actor€”either a British stalwart, or one of those British-based Americans who have made €˜Token Yank€™ into a career.
Contributor
Contributor

Hamish Crawford writes fiction more easily than fact. His first volume of short fiction, “A Madhouse, Only With More Elegant Jackets”, was published in 2011 from First Edition Publishing. He has an English degree from the University of Calgary and a Screenwriting M.A. from the University of Westminster, which leaves little space on the wall for his several PhD. rejection letters. His stories and articles have appeared in such publications as NoD and the Cult Britannia website (www.cultbritannia.co.uk). In September he will be speaking at a Doctor Who 50th anniversary conference in Hertfordsire. The owner of far more hats than heads, Hamish currently lives in Canada, and is disappointed that the preceding biography contains so few factual errors. Visit his website: http://hamish-crawford.weebly.com