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20 Things You Didn't Know About Halloween (1978)

You can't kill the Boogeyman and, once you've read this article, it will be clear why!

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John Carpenter's original Halloween film from 1978 is seen as the father of modern slasher films. It remains one of the most successful independent films ever made and, arguably, Carpenter's best film.

Shot on a limited budget, Halloween does not lack in inventiveness, creating effective chills and thrills that other, higher budget horror films have failed to achieve.

It also introduced wider audiences to the incredible acting talent of Jamie Lee Curtis, who continues to be proud of her involvement with the film as its iconic "final girl", Laurie Strode, a role that she reprised in the 1981 sequel, Halloween II and in the film's more modern sequels and reinventions.

The film also provided a forum for Donald Pleasence to portray Michael Myers's psychiatrist, Dr. Sam Loomis, an unlikely good guy who appears to be almost as unhinged as Myers himself, thus ending Pleasence's streak of being typecast as evil characters. Of course, Myers - or The Shape - has become an icon of horror cinema in his own right.

Be sure to leave a comment if you "see anything you like" or if you think that something has been missed off this list!

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I started writing for WhatCulture in July 2020. I have always enjoyed reading and writing. I have contributed to several short story competitions and I have occasionally been fortunate enough to have my work published. During the COVID-19 lockdown, I also started reviewing films on my Facebook page. Numerous friends and contacts suggested that I should start my own website for reviewing films, but I wanted something a bit more diverse - and so here I am! My interests focus on film and television mainly, but I also occasionally produce articles that venture into other areas as well. In particular, I am a fan of the under appreciated sequel (of which there are many), but I also like the classics and the mainstream too.