DVD & Blu-Ray Lowdown 20.04.09

The Big BoysThe Day The Earth Stood Stilldayearth6423764782364 See Ray€™s full review here Yes Manyes-man3562357628345 Jim Carrey returns to familiar comic territory for Peyton Reed€™s adaptation of Danny Wallace€™s best-seller, and although this is pretty obviously formulaic stuff, Wallace€™s initial premise, coupled with good performances by Carrey and Zooey Deschanel and an excellent turn by my new favourite comic actor Rhys Darby make sure the film is a general success without ascending further. I wouldn€™t necessarily advise saying yes to buying the DVD, as if you€™ve got Liar Liar in your collection you€™ll not really need it (the two movies are more than mere siblings), but it€™s well worth a rent if you don€™t want to be particularly challenged. The Baader-Meinhof Complexthe-baader-meinhof-complex-10834689384976 See my full review here Transporter 3transporter33742657834658923 I don€™t really get The Staith€™s roaring popularity, and for me The Transporter franchise embodies my perpetual perplexity: I don€™t mind the high-octane thrills (Crank is one of the exceptions to my apathy) or even the appalling American accent, but there plainly isnt enough substance. If he€™s not careful, Staitham will end up endlessly reliving a Segal type existence, bouncing from one moronic anti-hero role to another. It€™s a shame as well, as I thought he was the best of the likely lads in Gu Ritchie€™s Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels. American Dad Season 4americandad343259804369841Family Guy gets the most plaudits of Seth Macfarlane€™s irreverent, and often controversial comedy cartoons, but American Dad deserves a lot of credit. Four seasons for anything living in Peter Griffin€™s considerable shadow, without Family Guy€™s yearly flirtations with cancellation is an impressive achievement, and is largely thanks to the show€™s irresistibly naughty political satire. The peripheral characters are not as high impact as the Quagmires and Clevelands of that other inky world, but the twin heads of Stan and Roger give Peter and Stewie a proper run for their money- Season 4 happily sees them afforded more screen time, recognising their role as fan favourites in the same way The Simpsons shifted focus from Bart to Homer many moons ago. Lost & Foundlost_and_found756765465432 A gorgeous animated adaptation of one of the most simple but touching children€™s books imaginable- I own three different versions of Oliver Jeffers€™ uplifting tale of loneliness and belonging, and unashamedly read them periodically such is my attachment. The best thing about this adaptation is that it remains true to the original story, and captures its emotion perfectly. It also features the voice talent of Jim Broadbent, whose homely tones always remind me of getting cuddled by an imaginary grandfather and the familiar warming sensation of soup and a roaring fire. The Borrowers has a lot to answer for. The Tale of Despereauxdespereaux23958209346734 Another animated mouse overcomes adversary. Yawn. Matthew Broderick is okay, I suppose, as he has one of those everyman nice-guy voices like Michael J Fox that is made for this kind of shit, but at the end of the day Despereaux doesn€™t have the iconic appeal of Mickey, the cheeky attraction of Stuart Little, or even the simplistic qualities of Fievel. Looking down at the cast list though you have to believe there was more confidence in this production than its execution inspired in me: Stanley Tucci, Frank Langella, William H Macy, Kevin Kline, Richard Jenkins- the list is impressive reading, and probably reflects the affection with which Kate DiCamillo€™s award winning story is held more than anything else. Problem is, there is no hint of justice in the way the film treats that story, and the plot is so badly rehashed, and sucked of its soul that there is little in the way of redeeming quality left. Dark Floors (The Lordi Motion Picture)darkfloors2347287964363 Mentionable only because of its blood-minded ridiculousness. It was only a matter of time before Lordi went the next step with their act; after all they entice their audiences to suspend a certain amount of belief and accept the theatre of their performances unquestionably thanks to their other-worldly appearances. It isnt just that they are dressed up- like Kiss or Slipknot- they inherently are the characters they appear to be. In all honesty, Dark Floors could have been a lot worse: it deserved to be a campy, poorly acted vehicle for Lordi to strut their demonic stuff on the silver-screen with the typical lack of plot that goes hand in hand with musicians attempts to cross over successfully. But it is far more subtle than that, and actually looks pretty impressive- Citizen Cane it certainly isn€™t, but it is ultimately watchable and will find an audience with the great made-up unwashed hordes who worship the Finnish band. Breaking Out of the Mire:fingerprints2138570239465Finger Prints Again, I€™m confronted with a horror movie with children ghosties in it- always the most affecting ghoulies to the colour of my pants. Taking its plot from a collection of urban legends attached to a train versus bus crash in San Antonio, Texas that obliterated the kiddies on the bus and scattered their ghosts all over the immediate vicinity, Finger Prints is a pretty effective ghost story. Provided you ignore the plot holes, and blindly follow the narrative, you€™ll get something more out of it than the majority of its cheaply made horror bed-fellows. It wont ever be The Orphanage, or even Kevin Bacon€™s surprisingly scary Stir of Echoes, but it definitely gets the hairs on end and the pulse racing, and it features the one and only Lou Diamond Phillips, so it cant be all that bad. Er, hang on€ Also Available:Stone of Destiny; Lark Rise to Candleford Series 2; Being Human Series 1; Murder She Wrote Series 9; Ultra (1990); Screamers 2; Reeker 2.Blu-Ray ReleasesX-Men Trilogy; Daredevil; The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

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