Star Wars: 20 Things You Didn't Know About The Last Jedi

Breaking down the most controversial Star Wars movie of all time.

Star Wars The Last Jedi
Disney

There is, simply put, no more divisive Star Wars movie than The Last Jedi, which depending on who you ask is either a masterpiece or a flaming dumpster fire.

Writer-director Rian Johnson's big blockbuster break took one look at The Force Awakens' safe, unambitious franchise resurrection and offered up a more daring, boundary-pushing sequel that carved its own subversive path and split the fanbase straight down the middle.

Yet love it or hate it, the Discourse surrounding The Last Jedi is so pervasively exhausting that you couldn't really be blamed for dipping out and just... not engaging with the movie one way or another.

And so, away from all the toxicity, there's probably plenty you actually don't know about The Last Jedi, from fascinating aspects of its production to sneaky Easter eggs, cameos, and happy accidents that ultimately made the movie what it is.

Whether you dig Rian Johnson's singular vision or not, it's perhaps the most intriguing and unexpected Star Wars production since the original, even if the polarising response led to a catastrophic over-correction with the widely maligned The Rise of Skywalker.

And so, here's 20 things you didn't know about The Last Jedi...

20. Mark Hamill HATED Luke's Characterisation

Star Wars The Last Jedi
Disney

Perhaps the single most divisive aspect of The Last Jedi was Luke Skywalker's (Mark Hamill) characterisation, reinventing him as a more world-weary, beaten down exiled Jedi, and one who even considered killing Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) years prior.

Fans weren't the only ones upset by this, as even Mark Hamill himself wasn't best pleased with how Luke was written, enough that he made as much clear to Rian Johnson himself.

In an interview during the movie's press tour, Hamill said that he told Johnson:

"I pretty much fundamentally disagree with every choice you've made for this character. Now, having said that, I have gotten it off my chest, and my job now is to take what you've created and do my best to realise your vision."

Hamill did however later apologise for "voicing [his] doubts and insecurities in public," and added that despite his creative misgivings, Johnson made an "all-time great" movie.

Contributor
Contributor

Stay at home dad who spends as much time teaching his kids the merits of Martin Scorsese as possible (against the missus' wishes). General video game, TV and film nut. Occasional sports fan. Full time loon.