Advertisement

Contestant Dies After Obstacle Course On John Cena's Wipeout

The man passed away after finishing course on rebooted show.

TBS

A man has died after filming an obstacle course run on TBS's rebooted version of Wipeout.

According to a report from TMZ, the incident occurred on Wednesday when a contestant required urgent medical attention having completed the course. He was tended to by paramedics on set, who then called the emergency services.

The man was rushed to hospital, where he later passed away.

Advertisement

TMZ's law enforcement sources said they received a cardiac arrest call just prior to noon. The on-site medical team had already applied defibrillators when the ambulance arrived. The man had been experiencing chest pains.

It's understood that the production has various precautions in place for the health and safety of its participants. All contestants undergo a medical exam before filming, and there are two paramedics on location, as well as a paramedic coördinator and safety producer.

Advertisement

The new version of Wipeout, which originally ran from 2004-2018, is hosted by multi-time WWE Champion and Hollywood star John Cena, alongside comedian Nicole Beyer. Cena is also an Executive Producer of the game show.

Production company Endemol Shine North America issued a statement following the tragedy:

Advertisement
"We offer our heartfelt condolences to the family and our thoughts are with them at this time."

TBS, who have yet to confirm a date for Wipeout's premiere, also released a statement:

"We are devastated to have learned of his passing and our deepest sympathy goes out to the family."
Want to write about John Cena? Get started below...

Create Content and Get Paid


In this post: 
John Cena
 
Posted On: 
Editorial Team
Editorial Team

Benjamin was born in 1987, and is still not dead. He variously enjoys classical music, old-school adventure games (they're not dead), and walks on the beach (albeit short - asthma, you know). He's currently trying to compile a comprehensive history of video game music, yet denies accusations that he purposefully targets niche audiences. He's often wrong about these things.