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10 Times WWE Were OBSESSED With Pointless Power

With no power comes no responsibility.

WWE

There is no diminished return quite as diminished as the pro wrestling boss. Nearly every wrestling authority figure has been cr*p, and don't let any treasured memories of whomever happened to be in charge when you first started watching colour the reality.

For those of the original pro wrestling boom, it was WWE President Jack Tunney. There was a lot to appreciate about the administrative capacity he upheld when he did appear on screen, but even his integrity was questioned by babyfaces and heels alike as and when they wanted to curry favour. For the millions that came aboard during the Attitude Era, Vince McMahon had reshaped and refined Eric Bischoff's innovative corporate sh*thouse character to make a fortune with Steve Austin then progressively less with everybody else. If Ruthless Aggression was your jam, Vince McMahon had reshaped and refined Eric Bischoff's innovative corporate sh*thouse character and given it back to him, diluted and diffused. The slide was never arrested right up until December 2018, when the exasperated McMahon family gave all of us the job instead just to ensure there'd be rightfully-apportioned blame if and when the numbers sunk again.

The benefit of a Tunney (and to a lesser extent Gorilla Monsoon before the role became a trope) was in how they simply had power rather yielded it. They made money and sense without making waves.

The following lot did the total opposite - men and women booked to hate their staff and fear their bosses for motivations and gains almost never explored.

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Contributor

We Need To Talk About Kevin (Nash). Michael can be found in articles or on podcasts extolling the virtues of New Generation WWF, New Japan Pro Wrestling or the new WWE angle they definitely definitely won’t ruin this time.