Kevin Dunn's Potential WWE Successors Have 'Life Made Difficult'

Production rivals 'constantly criticised to Vince McMahon'.

WWE Network

Production staff who could eventually replace Kevin Dunn as WWE's chief in charge of their television output have their lives "made difficult", according to a report in this week's issue of Wrestling Observer Newsletter.

One such heir apparent, Michael Mansury, the company's Vice President of Global Television production, left the company last month. Mansury was said to be Dunn's understudy, taking on directorial duties for episodes of Raw and SmackDown his higher-up did not attend.

According to the report, insiders were shocked that the 11-year employee had departed the company. One inside source told the newsletter that Mansury's situation echoed that of former producer David Sahadi, now of Impact Wrestling. Apparently, those who threaten Dunn's position are "constantly criticised to Vince McMahon", with chances of career progression severely hampered.

Mansury was said to be unhappy with his lack of further opportunities. He had last been promoted four years ago.

The implication is that, tired of being held back by WWE lifer Dunn, Mansury has quit the company in search of a fresh challenge.

Dunn's name has been in the headlines this week after the latest episode of Vice's Dark Side of the Ring, centred around the death of Owen Hart, revealed that he coldly gave announcer Jim Ross the tragic news, before telling him he was on air in ten seconds.

Hired in 1984, Dunn has served in a producer role for WWE for over 30 years, following in the footsteps of his father Dennis, who worked a similar role for Vince McMahon Sr.

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Editorial Team
Editorial Team

Benjamin was born in 1987, and is still not dead. He variously enjoys classical music, old-school adventure games (they're not dead), and walks on the beach (albeit short - asthma, you know). He's currently trying to compile a comprehensive history of video game music, yet denies accusations that he purposefully targets niche audiences. He's often wrong about these things.