Ranking Every AEW Wrestler's 2020 From Worst To Best

Jon Moxley, Britt Baker, and MJF have had incredible years, but how does AEW's roster rank in 2020?

AEW ranked 2020
AEW

2020 has been a year unlike any other in professional wrestling, with the devastating global pandemic forcing the sport into empty or sparsely-populated arenas from March onwards.

This made composing this year's AEW roster rankings considerably harder. Overness is the most important factor to consider when assessing a wrestler's performances, and how do you assess overness? Audience engagement. Crowd reactions.

Regardless, AEW is generally a well-booked company. It's rare that they get a performer's presentation entirely wrong, and when they do, course correction is typically swift and effective. That Tony Khan and his Executive Vice Presidents are guiding hands rather than iron-fisted rulers almost certainly contributes to this.

AEW's increased creative freedom failure-proofs it, but only to a certain degree: certain wrestlers at the lower end of our list show that no wrestling promotion, no matter how loose its guidelines are, will ever get everyone right at the same time.

Rankings are not necessarily reflective of a performer's perceived talent or effort. Instead, the factors determining these rankings include quality of output, presentation, positioning, quality of pushes and programs, and effectiveness in their roles as televised wrestlers and personalities. Keep in mind that many of these are subjective and that only wrestlers that are (or were) listed on AEW's official roster page were considered.

Let's light the fuse...

77. Jimmy Havoc

AEW ranked 2020
AEW

The Englishman was let go from the promotion after being implicated in a scandal that saw him accused of assault, domestic abuse, and rape.

How could anyone in AEW have possibly had a worse year than that?

Senior Reporter
Senior Reporter

Andy has been with WhatCulture for six years and is currently WhatCulture's Senior Wrestling Reporter. A writer, presenter, and editor with 10+ years of experience in online media, he has been a sponge for all wrestling knowledge since playing an old Royal Rumble 1992 VHS to ruin in his childhood. Having previously worked for Bleacher Report, Andy specialises in short and long-form writing, video presenting, voiceover acting, and editing, all characterised by expert wrestling knowledge and commentary. Andy is as much a fan of 1985 Jim Crockett Promotions as he is present-day AEW and WWE - just don't make him choose between the two.