Doctor Who: Ranking New Who Companions From Best To Worst

The Doctor’s companion is one of the most important parts, if not the most important part, of Doctor Who as…

Cailin Coane

Contributor

nuwho-rose

The Doctor’s companion is one of the most important parts, if not the most important part, of Doctor Who as a show. The Doctor himself can be as brilliant and dazzling as ever, but if the companion is dull or not relatable for the audience, the show’s whole dynamic falls through. Since the show’s revival in 2005, the Doctor has had everything from brilliant, funny, incredibly awesome companions to flat, one-dimensional, irritating ones (not naming any names – well, not yet, anyway) to accompany him across time and space. Here I’ll attempt to rank them from best to worst, and how their presence affected the Doctor and even the show as a whole.

(On a side note, I will focus on the companions who had pretty consistent runs within a season (or seasons, in the Ponds’ case). Companions will not make it onto the list if they were a one-off, like Adam in Season 1, or Mickey Smith, who was incredibly annoying. Seriously, does anyone really like Mickey?)

Keep in mind that throughout this, a SPOILER WARNING will be in effect. You’ve been warned.

 

Rose Tyler – Defender Of The Earth

Rosetyler

Best Episode: The Parting of the Ways

“The Doctor showed me a better way of living your life. You know, he showed you, too. That you don’t just give up. You don’t just let things happen. You make a stand! You say no! You have the guts to do what’s right, when everyone else just runs away.”

Rose starts out as an ordinary kid, just working in a shop, living everyday life, and becomes the Bad Wolf, the Defender of the Earth, and the woman who falls in love with two Doctors – one she absorbs the time vortex for, and the other she tears through an alternate universe to find. She knows what she wants, and she goes after it no matter what the cost. That is what makes Rose the true badass she is.

The best Doctor and companion relationships are when they both change each other for the better. Being with Rose made the Doctor stop being a war-weary soldier and start loving life again – so much so that he “[didn’t] want to go.” Being with the Doctor gave Rose purpose and direction; in the course of two seasons she goes from a girl with no direction or real accomplishments in her life to an incredibly determined, resourceful, and fearless individual who never gives up until she finds her Doctor again in Season 4. Needless to say, I’m thrilled she (and Ten-Two) will be back for the 50th Anniversary Special!