10 Scariest Technology Horror Movies

Hacked webcams, devices gone rogue - Which of these movies make you fearful of technology?

VIdeodrome Movie
Universal Pictures

Technology - it's an integral piece of modern-day life. It's what separates humans from beasts, and it's what drives our society forward. But, it can also be downright terrifying.

Contemporary life is so directly impacted by our machines and tools that it can sometimes be frightening to imagine existence without them. Still, in equal measure, the idea of technology gone array presents a new form of storytelling that can be truly nightmarish.

Horror movies excel when they manipulate the average persons most typical anxieties and invades their personal space. Rather than presenting them with an utterly unrelatable subject matter, a horror movie based on something that's an intrinsic part of someone's everyday routine has made for some fantastic films.

The following ten entries are phenomenal - and terrifying - examples of movies that took the concept of technology and explore what it could mean for horror. They all approach the subject differently, with some being subtle examinations of how the internet can affect people's lives and others being full-blown robotic and mechanical nightmare-fuel.

When you're reading this, keep an eye on whatever device you're using, in case it turns on you.

10. EXistenZ

VIdeodrome Movie
Miramax

Despite the rather cheesy and goofy title, this is a harrowing horror flick that deals with some compelling and inventive concepts. It comes from the legendary mind of David Cronenberg, so it's no surprise that the practical imagery is horrifying. It's a fascinating exploration of video gaming, virtual reality, and assassination.

The movie follows a game designer named Allegra Geller - played wonderfully by Jennifer Jason Leigh. Geller, who has become a target for international assassins, plays through the virtual reality game she has created - named Existenz - with a marketing trainee to test if it is safe.

As can be expected from this director, there is a tonne of biological/technological body horror, which taints the idea of humanity and plays with the very concept of the relationship between human and machine. At the heart of the film is a truly frightening story about the connection between the virtual world and the real one.

It's gooey, slimy and yet still mechanical, giving it a distinctly hybrid vibe. If the film hadn't released around the same time as The Matrix, it might be remembered better today.

Contributor

Michael is my name, overanalysing comedy is my game! I’m a Bristol-boy who moved out to Surrey to get his BA and then moved on to get an MA from the Guildford School of Acting. I am your bog-standard freaky geeky lad.