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8 Disturbing Meanings Of 2013's Biggest Tracks

We can blame the advent of streaming music all day long, but we can't blame the artists for not trying to at least shake things up with songs that left us feeling confused, uneasy and absolutely disturbed.

2013 was a big year for music as moments within the industry grabbed headlines. From outlandish performances at the VMA's to bitter in-fighting between major performers, it seemed like everyone was competing to be the most controversial artist of the year. And so they should, seeing as music sales are on the decline for the first time since iTunes came onto the scene. We can blame the advent of streaming music all day long, but we can't blame the artists for not trying to at least shake things up with songs that left us feeling confused, uneasy and absolutely disturbed.

8. Blurred Lines - Robin Thicke

Leave it to Robin Thicke to make a song about rape popular. Oh, I'm sorry you don't think the song is about rape? Even my parents figured that out when my niece was blasting the song lyrics in front of their troubled faces. Let's be honest:
But you're an animal, baby, it's in your nature. Just let me liberate you.
And, of course, the chorus exists:
I hate these blurred lines. I know you want it.
It's not just the fact that he outright says there is a blurred line here (rape vs. date rape vs. what I guess he calls advanced flirtation). It's also the fact that he is being annoyingly repetitive (and persistent) with this "good" girl who is apparently not having it. Maybe you're not convinced. I've met people like you. But we honestly cannot forget how this song was used to display - onstage - just how crazy Miley Cyrus has decided to be. If that's not a version of Robin Thicke's Stockholm Syndrome lyrics, then I just give up.
Contributor
Contributor

Jon is the author of the Pixar Theory, the narrative that combines all of the Pixar movies in one timeline. You can read more about his random nonsense on jonnegroni.com