Enter Shikari Albums Ranked From Worst To Best

From Take To The Skies To Nothing Is True And Everything Is Possible, which album is best?

By Drew de F Fawkes (Enter Shikari, Rose Theatre, Kingston) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

With the release of Nothing is True and Everything is Possible, Enter Shikari have now released six albums, each with their merits.

From youthful rage to mature channelled anger, the band have grown and the albums reflect that. Later albums are not as heavy as their initial offerings. This has led to accusations of them having sold out or lost their appeal, but that essence of what makes Shikari who they are has not been lost.

The St. Albans band are never afraid to push boundaries and experiment with their sound, leading to their fandom covering a broad church and audiences regularly featuring a whole gamut of different demographics.

The albums are as diverse as the fanbase. Each release has its own individual character making them incomparable to one another, but if forced into a decision, which comes out on top?

6. A Flash Flood Of Colour

This is a brilliant album overall and it's harsh to have this ranked as last. But if your whole discography is stacked, something has to come last despite being amazing.

Gandhi Mate, Gandhi is a wonderful mix of anger and clever lyricism - a hallmark of early Shikari greats. Constellations rounds off the album neatly whilst having a resolute feeling of although the world is a mess, we can do our own little bit.

Throughout the album there is a fusion of styles which makes this band so characteristic whilst making them undefinable. That being said, this is definitely a shift from the early style to a more electronic based sound which could be incorporated into a DJ set, produced under Shikari Sound System.

Shikari also made a documentary, which provides a fascinating insight into the creative process and a topless Rou (Reynolds, the lead singer) - who could ask for anything more?

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Contributor

Peter Barnes hasn't written a bio just yet, but if they had... it would appear here.