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10 Mind-Blowing Facts You Didn't Know About Babylon 5

Humanity's last best hope for an epic TV show, all alone in the realm of reruns.

TNT

In the world of science fiction television, Babylon 5 stands by itself. On its surface it may appear to be just another cheesy, low-budget relic of the 1990s sci-fi landscape, but a closer examination reveals a much more complex, intriguing premise.

Babylon 5 was set during "the Third Age of Man", roughly 10 years after the end of Earth's war with the Minbari. The goal of the station was to act as a neutral site for humans and aliens to come together and work out their problems without resorting to violence or war. Although a war came despite everyone's best efforts, the fearless officers of Babylon 5 paved the way for a brighter future for the entire galaxy, albeit one that came with a high price.

Despite the gripping plot and compelling characters, Babylon 5 remains relatively unknown. But there is no mistaking the impact it left on the TV landscape. Many modern shows owe their success to Babylon 5 and the changes it brought to how stories were told on the television.

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10. It Was One Of The First Shows To Use The Internet To Interact With Its Fans

Warner Brothers

Nowadays, it is quite common the cast and crew of TV shows to interact with the audience through various social media platforms. But in the days before Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, interacting with audiences required a bit more skill. Fortunately for Babylon 5, its creator, J. Michael Straczynski, frequently logged in to different online forums, and he used these forums to help promote the show.

Participating in online forums made it easy to interact with viewers, answering questions and taking comments. Straczynski would also drop teasers about what to expect in next week's episode, fueling anticipation and encouraging even more people to tune in. Babylon 5 was one of the first shows to interact with its audience in this manner.

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Paula Luther hails from Pennsylvania and has been an avid Whovian since 2008. She enjoys writing (obviously), reading, dancing, video editing, and building websites. She has also self-published two books on Amazon, "Bart the Bard" and "Android Mae and Other Stories".