10 Things You Didn't Know About ALL IN

AEW will make history at Wembley Stadium, just like the company's key players did back in 2018.

All In
AEW

"The Biggest Event In Wrestling History" is an amazing tagline.

It's as dumb-sounding as WWE promoting "The Greatest Wrestling Match Ever" or "The Most Stupendous WrestleMania Of All Time", but it's standing an incredibly good chance of being objectively true. Factually accurate promotion from a wrestling company, what a time to be alive!

80,000+ tickets have currently been distributed for the event, the vast majority of them sold, and measured against the real figures for some of the biggest events from the market leader, only WrestleMania 32's 80,709 paid stands in the way of the hyperbole being legitimised beyond anybody’s wildest expectations.

The show is so massive that it’s become the subject of some controversy along the way, with significant discourse online about the quality of the card and the company’s booking in general. Within this, there’s been an increasing move to consider the show a spiritual sequel to 2018’s original ALL IN rather than a canonical AEW classic, and while that’s up for debate, the mere idea of doing this historic second version of the show couldn’t and wouldn’t have entered the wildest dreams of those at the centre of the first.

Some of the differences in the five years since are so stark, that it’s remarkable anybody’s been able to draw a line between the events at all…

10. Only 12 Current AEW Contracted Acts Were On The Original ALL IN

All In
AEW

Though so much of All Elite Wrestling's DNA runs through All In 2018, the five year gap between the original and the sequel has revealed a fairly low return of names that could lay a claim to a spot on both shows.

Just 12 acts from the total 43 that featured on the card are full time with AEW in 2023, and even some of those are people that had affiliate roles on the original.

MJF , Scorpio Sky, Dr Britt Baker DMD, Madison Rayne, Jeff Jarrett, Hangman Page, Penelope Ford, Jay Lethal, Kenny Omega, The Lucha Bros, The Young Bucks and Bandido are the fortunate few, and of them, Jarrett was a ringside assistant for Nick Aldis in 2018, and there's a good chance that the likes of Sky, Rayne, Ford, Lethal, The Lucha Bros and 'Double J' won't walk the Wembley aisle.

For the much, much better, the times have changed since the original Chicago supershow. But the lack of those still around to be part of the revolution comes as quite a shock.

Contributor
Contributor

Michael is a writer, editor, podcaster and presenter for WhatCulture Wrestling, and has been with the organisation over 7 years. He primarily produces written, audio and video content on WWE and AEW, but also provides knowledge and insights on all aspects of the wrestling industry thanks to a passion for it dating back over 30 years. As one third of "The Dadley Boyz", Michael has contributed to the huge rise in popularity of the WhatCulture Wrestling Podcast, earning it top spot in the UK's wrestling podcast charts with well over 50,000,000 total downloads. He has been featured as a wrestling analyst for the Tampa Bay Times and Sports Guys Talking Wrestling, and has covered milestone events in New York, Dallas, Las Vegas, London and Cardiff. Michael's background in media stretches beyond wrestling coverage, with a degree in Journalism from the University Of Sunderland (2:1) and a series of published articles in sports, music and culture magazines The Crack, A Love Supreme and Pilot. When not offering his voice up for daily wrestling podcasts, he can be found losing it singing far too loud watching his favourite bands play live. Follow him on X/Twitter - @MichaelHamflett