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Final Fantasy 7 Remake Has Changed The Franchise Forever

Alright everybody, let's mosey.

Square Enix

Introducing the world of Midgar to new audiences was a mammoth task to undertake, but perhaps more so was the feat of impressing long-time fans of the original. Squaresoft’s beloved 1997 classic Final Fantasy VII refined the tried-and-tested formula of turn-based JRPG’s while bringing its presentation into the age of 3D design, and over its 23-year life has amassed a following that rivals any Nintendo offering.

Cloud’s journey alongside an unlikely cast of characters was entirely unique in a sea of other exceptional JRPG titles on its native PS1, so it’s no wonder that in 2020 the story is being retold using the power of current-gen technology.

The aptly titled Final Fantasy VII Remake finally(!) hit shelves in the spring of this year, and with it a new-found fondness of the franchise. Final Fantasy is almost as old as the gaming medium it resides in, with the first entry releasing in 1987, and its path to the disastrous 2020 has been paved with trailblazing storytelling, some minor hiccups and a whole host of lovingly crafted characters. And yet, some 33 years later, the series has found its most significant change to date.

Final Fantasy VII Remake is a true return to form for a series that has struggled to find its footing since the PS2 era. With the industry now rapping on the door of the PS5 and XBOX Series X releases this fall, the popular JRPG series has proven that the magic of the past can be replicated, and even enhanced with current technology. Cloud leaping from the train to begin his quest to stop Sephiroth has captured the attention of a whole new generation, and in doing so has given a tired franchise newfound momentum in the years to come.

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Contributor

Fan of ducks, ice tea and escapism. Spends much of his time persistently saying 'I have so much studying to do' before watching Zoey 101 for the millionth time. Thinks Uncharted 3 is the best one.