10 Times Players Broke MMORPGs

Some gamers just want to see the (online) world burn.

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Daybreak Game Company

MMORPGs are unlike any other genre of game out there.

You're not just stepping into the shoes of a hero for a few hours, you carefully curate your own and the path they walk as you explore huge worlds and unlimited possibilities.

They generally tend not to be the prettiest games on the market, but the time invested into your favourite MMO and the depth it can provide generates a different kind of immersion. To many players, their world and server of choice can become like a second home.

MMOs rely on people to keep them alive, after all if there's no players then there's no game. The choices and behaviours of gamers shape and mould the world, and the ongoing synergy between players and developers can define an MMO. Be that the happy, content and well mannered players... or those that want to shake things up.

Online games grant anonymity and therefore allow gamers to be as bad as they want to be. From simple cheating to outright malicious behaviour, sometimes players just want to see the world burn. MMOs are the perfect target since, by their very nature, they are living and evolving worlds.

10. Temple Of Ahn’qira - World Of Warcraft

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Blizzard

More than any other genre without doubt, MMORPGs demand time and patience. You won’t get good overnight and when it comes to the stereotype of gamers sitting at their desk for hours upon hours it brings to mind games like World of Warcraft.

That being said, even MMO players have their limits.

The Temple of Ahn’qiraj was a WoW dungeon released in 2006 as part of a major update. It was such a long and arduous raid that it was generally understood that it that would take 40 players more than a single sitting to complete.. What frustrated players the most was the sheer number of bosses along the way to the end, not to mention the number of random enemies.

A sneaky American guild discovered that it was possible to skip most of the dungeon by looking at the game’s files and doing some very careful deleting. It altered the boundaries on a set of stairs by the first boss which players could use to bypass a huge chunk of the raid and get to the final showdown with C’Thun immediately.

When Blizzard saw accounts that had completed the raid and only taken out the end boss they weren’t too happy, patching the loophole and banning players that had exploited it.

Contributor
Contributor

Painting pictures with words and writing articles with wax crayons. Resident Evil obsessed. They/them.