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Inside The Gaming Studio - Child's Play Project Manager Jamie Dillion

childs-play-bear-4ecd168-intro But what good can Gaming provide for a sick child? The answer is normalcy. While we spend most of our lives trying to move away from being the 'norm', we often take for granted the comfort it offers us. In a world where a child can not spend the majority of time at home, that not only wreaks havoc on the child's life but also a parents'.
Games allow children and their families to play together - in the face of pain and the reality that some kids don't get better, the ability to play is both rare and precious. Children can socialize with their parents and siblings in a way that isn't restricted by or focused on being sick - they can spend a little time just being kids.
Jamie also directed me to thesethreeexamples of how games have proven to help recovery and attitude of children who are seriously ill. There are of course many more examples than just these, but google is only a click away. If you are starting feel generous Jamie explains:
It's more or less up to the donor and what's easiest for them. The Amazon.com wishlists are available for US and Canadian facilities and are a great way to pick something special and have it sent directly to a local facility or a facility that means something to the donor. Donating through Paypal on our website is the fastest and easiest way to donate for local or international supporters. There's also information about mailing checks as well on our website.
And just because you are an international reader, you can still help. The charity:
have approximately 90 network hospitals, which includes international facilities in Canada, the UK, Australia, and even Egypt.
Child's Play are a fantastic charity. There are of course many wonderful charities, but Child's Play speaks to me on a different level. It affirms my confidence that one of my favorite past times has the ability to inspire, be a wonderful artistic experiences but also, and possibly most importantly, help. As a playing community, we often antagonise each other merely for that sake of it. We curse the people who give us these products and at the same time, they curse us. But I think Jamie hit the nail on the head when she explains:
Many gamers can relate to getting lost in games - we've all been elated and felt larger-than-life when we finally beat that difficult boss fight or clear to the next level. That sense of empowerment, entertainment and distraction is so valuable to sick kids, and I think the gaming community can easily see that connection.
And seen that connection it has. That is a ton of money that has been raised for the charity. (2,542 tonnes to be precise). I would even wager a few of you have donated your bit to the them already. Hopefully, you are interested enough in checking out the charity for yourself and figuring out if it is for you. I would whole heartedly recommend it though. In a time where we and the outside world are questioning our worth to the world, it is a great way to remember the power that gaming has.
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Patrick Dane is someone who spends too much of his time looking at screens. Usually can be seen pretending he works as a film and game blogger, short film director, PA, 1st AD and scriptwriter. Known to frequent London screening rooms, expensive hotels, couches, Costa coffee and his bedroom. If found, could you please return to the internet.